WHEN YOU’RE TEMPTED by a Buy-One-Get-One-Free (BOGOF) offer at your local supermarket, are you aware that the original supplier of the product is paying for the free item That’s because suppliers depend so much on the supermarket as a customer that it can dictate terms – and sometimes these terms are tough.
You may not have heard of Aquatec. The first Aquatec lamp I used was remarkable for its small size, robustness and amazing light output. Things have moved on apace since then. Aquatec brought out a 230 lumen lamp that was very successful, and also made something very similar for the bigger brand name Scubapro to sell.
The problem for any manufacturer when it does this is that the buying public tends to prefer the option of the big brand, because that company has spent years and not a little money developing its image.
Direct sales fall as a consequence, and before long the original supplier’s business starts to depend on its big-brand customer. As we all know, dependence comes at a risk.
This is why it’s important for Aquatec to maintain sales of its products under its own label, and to find a reason for customers to prefer it. Hence the Aquatec Aqua-Marine LED.
This product is not too dissimilar to the highly thought-of Scubapro Nova Light 230, in that it has roughly the same appearance to its black anodised aluminium body, but there are several distinct differences, including the fact that it is slimmer, and shorter at about 17cm.

Light Source
This 300-lumen lamp is a development of Aquatec’s 230-lumen model. It uses electronics to squeeze the extra light from its Cree LED, and the extra heat generated is conducted away by a generous coiled copper heat-sink positioned immediately behind it, and open to a flow of water around it.

Power Source
This lamp is fired up by means of three little AAA batteries that sit in a battery-chassis within the handle of the lamp. It is the use of these small power sources that has enabled the manufacturer to reduce the size, because the 230-lumen model employed 3 C-cells.
This implies increased voltage over reduced amperage. It is remarkable that the electronics still manage to give as much as 15 hours’ burntime from such a reduced battery-pack.

Switching
In a departure from the screw-down-to-make-contact switching routine of previous Aquatec lamps, the Aqua-Marine LED uses a push-button switch at the rear end.
To access the batteries, the whole rear end is unscrewed, complete with switch, which uses a large diameter non-slip button to make switching on or off a positive event.
The mechanism employs a heavy-duty spring, which I believe is important to its function when under the pressure of depth.
Other lamps I have tried that used a push-button switch, but with a less robust spring, have tended to prove unreliable when under water. The rubber grip at the front end is for style only.

Beam
Thanks to a deep reflector, the beam produced forms a particularly narrow spot that will have a good penetrative effect in murky water.
The peripheral halo is very weak indeed by comparison. n When you’re tempted by a Buy-One-Get-One-Free (BOGOF) offer at your local supermarket, are you aware that the original supplier of the product is paying for the free item That’s because suppliers depend so much on the supermarket as a customer that it can dictate terms – and sometimes these terms are tough.
You may not have heard of Aquatec. The first Aquatec lamp I used was remarkable for
its small size, robustness and amazing light output. Things have moved on apace since then. Aquatec brought out a 230 lumen lamp that was very successful, and also made something very similar for the bigger brand name Scubapro to sell.
The problem for any manufacturer when it does this is that the buying public tends to prefer the option of the big brand, because that company has spent years and not a little money developing its image.
Direct sales fall as a consequence, and before long the original supplier’s business starts to depend on its big-brand customer. As we all know, dependence comes at a risk.
This is why it’s important for Aquatec to maintain sales of its products under its own label, and to find a reason for customers to prefer it. Hence the Aquatec Aqua-Marine LED.
This product is not too dissimilar to the highly thought-of Scubapro Nova Light 230, in that it has roughly the same appearance to its black anodised aluminium body, but there are several distinct differences, including the fact that it is slimmer, and shorter at about 17cm.

Light Source
This 300-lumen lamp is a development of Aquatec’s 230-lumen model. It uses electronics to squeeze the extra light from its Cree LED, and the extra heat generated is conducted away by a generous coiled copper heat-sink positioned immediately behind it, and open to a flow of water around it.

Power Source
This lamp is fired up by means of three little AAA batteries that sit in a battery-chassis within the handle of the lamp. It is the use of these small power sources that has enabled the manufacturer to reduce the size, because the 230-lumen model employed 3 C-cells.
This implies increased voltage over reduced amperage. It is remarkable that the electronics still manage to give as much as 15 hours’ burntime from such a reduced battery-pack.

Switching
In a departure from the screw-down-to-make-contact switching routine of previous Aquatec lamps, the Aqua-Marine LED uses a push-button switch at the rear end.
To access the batteries, the whole rear end is unscrewed, complete with switch, which uses a large diameter non-slip button to make switching on or off a positive event.
The mechanism employs a heavy-duty spring, which I believe is important to its function when under the pressure of depth.
Other lamps I have tried that used a push-button switch, but with a less robust spring, have tended to prove unreliable when under water. The rubber grip at the front end is for style only.

Beam
Thanks to a deep reflector, the beam produced forms a particularly narrow spot that will have a good penetrative effect in murky water.
The peripheral halo is very weak indeed by comparison.

Comparable (but very differently priced) pocket lights to consider:
Intova Compact, £37; Lenser Frogman LED, £49; UK SL3 eLED, £49; Seac Luce LED, £66; Metalsub XRE 1000, £333; L&M Sola Dive 500, £335

SPECS
PRICE £78
LAMP Single LED
LUMENS 300
BURNTIME 15hr
DEPTH RATING 150m
BATTERIES 3 AA
CHARGE TIME n/a
WEIGHT IN AIR 225g (inc batteries)
CONTACT www.hydrotech.co.uk
DIVER GUIDE width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100% width=100%