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Project Britannic

Appeared in DIVER August 2012

It’s no small undertaking to explore Titanic’s sister-ship, the WW1 hospital vessel Britannic, which lies deep off Greece. A recent expedition with wreck preservation as its main aim took place in May, so how were the many pitfalls overcome? Organiser ALEXANDER SOTIROU should know – photos by GEORGE RIGOUTSOS and JOACHIM BLOMME

HMHS Britannic was the White Star Line’s biggest Olympic-class liner – and, at 269m long, the biggest ship to be sunk during WW1. Launched in Belfast in early 1914, she never carried passengers but went into service as a hospital ship the following ye
HMHS Britannic was the White Star Line’s biggest Olympic-class liner – and, at 269m long, the biggest ship to be sunk during WW1. Launched in Belfast in early 1914, she never carried passengers but went into service as a hospital ship the following year. She struck a mine in the Kea Channel on 21 November, 1916, with 1066 people on board. All but 30 were rescued.

  • Team Britannic 2012
    Team Britannic 2012
  • Port side of HMHS Britannic, near the navigation light position. The seabed is at around 120m
    Port side of HMHS Britannic, near the navigation light position. The seabed is at around 120m
  • The mixed-gas divers worked as two four-man teams
    The mixed-gas divers worked as two four-man teams
  • The water sampler was placed next to a pair of lifeboat davits
    The water sampler was placed next to a pair of lifeboat davits
  • Artist’s impression of the wreck of HMHS Britannic
    Artist’s impression of the wreck of HMHS Britannic
  • Ascending to the deco station
    Ascending to the deco station
  • Alexander Sotirou
    Alexander Sotirou
  • Click on any thumbnail photo to enlarge it and use the slideshow
    Click on any thumbnail photo to enlarge it and use the slideshow